Records Revisited: The Nerve Agents / ‘Days of the White Owl’ (2000)

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Records Revisited is a feature where we take albums that are 10+ years old, pull them off the shelf, dust them off, and see how they hold up.

Records Revisited: The Nerve Agents / Days of the White Owl (2000)

Revisited by: Tola Sweet [Tola Sweet plays guitar and writes songs for the Transducers, some of which can be found here.]

How does it hold up?

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Records Revisited: Screeching Weasel / ‘Thank You Very Little’ (2000)

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Record Revisited: Screeching Weasel / Thank You Very Little (2000)

Revisited by: Tola Sweet [Tola Sweet is a freelance audio engineer in D.C.  Formerly of Maine’s Transducers, he is currently spending his time putting together another group to play his shitty pop songs, which can be found here.]

How does it hold up?

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Records Revisited: Saves The Day / ‘Through Being Cool’ (1999)

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Record Revisited: Saves The Day / Through Being Cool (1999)

Revisited by: Joshua Amses [Joshua is a writer of books (whatever those are). He is the author of Raven or Crow and the forthcoming The Moment Before an Injury.]

How does it hold up?

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Records Revisited: Andrew W.K. Looks Back At ‘I Get Wet’ (2001)

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Record Revisited: Andrew W.K. / I Get Wet (2001)

Revisited by: Andrew W.K. (Andrew W.K. is the world’s most notorious party rocker. He is also a motivational speaker, producer, owner of the record label Skyscraper Music Maker, and part owner of the NYC venue Santos Party House.)

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Normally, for our Records Revisited segment, we like to have someone reflect on an old record that made an impact on him or her at one point in their lives. Some folks have used it to discuss their pop punk phases, others have examined their hardcore periods. But it was tough to find someone who could adequately reflect on Andrew W.K.’s I Get Wet. The album transcends genre, time periods, and music scenes and is arguably the most famous party rock album of all time. It breaks rock music down to its most basic elements.

With one simple message: Party!, Andrew W.K. instantly spawned a truly unique movement, one that perplexed many. With lyrics like: "It’s time to party. Let’s party. Hang out with yourself and have a crazy party. Hey you, let’s party. Have a killer party and party!" many asked: Was this a joke? A guilty pleasure? Was the madman on the album cover with a dried up bloody nose a genius? A lunatic? Some sort of party rock idiot savant like a headbanging, footstomping Rain Man? And no really, was this a joke?

But however you felt about its intent, it was hard to deny the sheer intensity and likability of I Get Wet. As W.K. himself would say, ”Don’t even try and deny it!” After all, how could you? Do you hate partying and having a good time? Do you hate fun? What kind of person hates fun and partying and having a good time? A very sad person, that’s who.

So, as the album turns over a decade old, and was recently reissued as a special deluxe anniversary edition, we thought: Who better to revisit I Get Wet than The Wolf himself, your friend, Andrew W.K.

It’s been almost 11 years since I Get Wet came out. Today, the album and just the culture of Andrew W.K. in general, is sort of a household thing. But at the time, was it difficult to get people, let alone a major label, to grasp what the hell you were doing?

Andrew W.K.: From what I’ve been told, It was very smooth the whole way. I’ve had the good fortune of working with a foundation that had already been built so it’s easy to get spoiled or assume it was all easy. I totally understand what you’re saying. But from what I understand from the people I’ve spoken to, the label was always very supportive. They actually were there building this as much as anyone else. So I think on the creative side too, they were spearheading almost the entire project rather than it being a typical battle. Of course, I had heard horror stories myself from other people’s experiences with labels where their record didn’t even come out. That’s the worst case scenario. They worked on the entire project and it doesn’t even get to be put out. But again, from what I understand, great team, very supportive, almost sort of instigated the idea rather than the other way around. So it was like a partnership.

So do you feel like they let you take it in the direction you wanted to take or were there points where they said, “we’d rather you do this or that?”

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Records Revisited: Eminem / ‘The Marshall Mathers LP’ (2000)

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Way back in the year 2000, Eminem released his second album (we’re not counting Infinite), The Marshall Mathers LP, which sold 1.76 million copies in its first week and sparked a whole lot of controversy. Some criticized the album’s lyrics for being homophobic, for advocating violence against women, and for just being repugnant in general. One unlikely musician (besides Elton John) did come to the album’s defense: Kevin Devine.

Devine, who at the time had not even yet released his first full album with Miracle of 86, wrote an essay on why it was the most punk rock album to be released that year. And since we can’t find that essay online, we’re going to assume we read it in a fanzine and feel old for the rest of the day. But Devine has since been a pretty vocal supporter of Eminem, writing defenses about him and covering his songs. Now that the The Marshall Mathers LP is 12 years old, we thought we’d have him revisit it to see if he still stands by it.

Record Revisited: Eminem / ‘The Marshall Mathers LP’ (2000)

Revisited by: Kevin Devine (Kevin Devine has been an active musician for years, fronting bands like Miracle of 86 before starting his solo career and playing in side projects like Bad Books. He is also known by as many as five people for his work in Delusion. In his spare time, he enjoys searching eBay for vintage Nirvana t-shirts and brushing his beard.)

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How does it hold up?

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Records Revisited: Catharsis / ‘Samsara’ (2000)

Record Revisited: Catharsis / ‘Samsara’ (2000)

Revisited by: Spencer Ackerman (Spencer writes about things that make us totally think about like, important stuff, and junk. You can find his musings on punk rock and national security on his website. He is a senior writer for WIRED.com so we follow him closely for any news of cyborgs rising up and killing us all.) 

How does it hold up?

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Records Revisited: Groovie Ghoulies / ‘World Contact Day’ (1996)

Record Revisited: Groovie Ghoulies / ‘World Contact Day’ (1996)

Revisited by Matt Siblo (Matt is a writer living in Washington, DC. He has written for The AV Club, Magnet, and The Washington City Paper and has been pushing his opinions of awful pop punk records on us for years.)

How does it hold up?

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Records Revisited: Earth Crisis / ‘Firestorm’ 7” (1993)

Record Revisited: Earth Crisis / ‘Firestorm’ (1993)

Revisited by Maggie Serota (Maggie is our favorite Low Times contributor, with Daniel in a close second, and Tom not placing. She is also a writer and can often be found reading an awful Sammy Hagar memoir.)

How does it hold up?

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Records Revisited: Circus Lupus / ‘Solid Brass’ (1993)

Record Revisited: Circus Lupus / ‘Solid Brass’ (1993)

Revisited by: Jessie Dean Altman (In addition to being a hilarious Twitter person with a heart of gold (@NancyJew), Jessie also prides herself in her extensive and awful record collection. See her music musings on her blog, Hey, What Gives?)

How does it hold up?

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